Du, ihr and Sie - German Polite Form with Video

Du, ihr and Sie – German Polite Form with Video

German Polite Form When to use du, ihr and Sie? In English, there is only one word to say you while in German there are three. The informal word is du in the singular and ihr in the plural. In the formal form, both singular and plural is Sie. You can now learn even more […]

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Wed, Oct 7th 2015 |
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German Indefinite Article with Video

German Indefinite Article with Video

The Indefinite Article What is an indefinite article? The indefinite article in English is the word a which changes into an if the following word starts with a vowel. In the plural we say either some, any or nothing at all. For example: I’d like a beer. We’d like an orange juice. Here are some […]

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Wed, Jul 8th 2015 |
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German Definite Articles der, die and das with Video

German Definite Articles der, die and das with Video

German Definite Article What is a noun? A noun is a word that names a person, an animal, a thing, a place or an idea. They can either be singular or plural. Nouns in German change their form in the plural as they do in English. For example: Oma ⇨ grandma Omas ⇨ grandmas   […]

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Wed, Jun 24th 2015 |
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German Word Order with Video

German Word Order with Video

German Word Order The word order is one of the biggest aspects of learning German and one of the first challenges to get your head round. Practice makes perfect and soon the word order will be natural to you but in the meantime use this grammar guide to help keep on top of it. You […]

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Thu, Jun 18th 2015 |
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German Weak Verbs with Video

German Weak Verbs with Video

Weak Verbs in the Present Tense A verb is an action word that describes what something or someone does, is or happens to them. For example: I dance a lot. She works at the weekend. Verbs have a base form. This is the form shown in a dictionary. The base form is called the infinitive. […]

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Wed, May 27th 2015 |
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German Subject Pronouns with Video

German Subject Pronouns with Video

Subject Pronouns What is a subject pronoun? A subject pronoun is a word such as I, you, he etc. It refers to a person or a thing that performs an action. A subject pronoun is linked to a verb, and in most cases the verb will follow it directly. For example: ich bin ⇨ I […]

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Wed, May 6th 2015 |
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German Two-Way Prepositions

German Two-Way Prepositions

German Two-Way Prepositions A preposition is a word such as for, without or to. Prepositions show the relationship of a noun or pronoun to some other words and are usually placed before the noun or pronoun. For example: This cake is for you. I can’t do it without your help. He moves to Germany. You […]

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Tue, Apr 28th 2015 |
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Plural Masculine and Neuter Nouns

Plural Masculine and Neuter Nouns

Plural Nouns Forming the plural of English nouns follows mostly the same pattern. In most cases you have to add -s to the end of the noun. For example: dog ⇨ dogs shop ⇨ shops There are some nouns in English that are irregular and do not follow this rule. For example: mouse ⇨ mice […]

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Tue, Apr 7th 2015 |
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German Weak Nouns

German Weak Nouns

German Weak Nouns German nouns can change according to their gender, case and number. This is called “declension”. Some German masculine nouns have a weak declension – this means that they end in -en, or if the word ends in a vowel, in -n. This happens in every case, except in the nominative. Here is […]

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Tue, Mar 24th 2015 |
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German Dative Prepositions

German Dative Prepositions

German Prepositions A preposition is a word such as for, without or to. Prepositions show the relationship of a noun or pronoun to some other words and are usually placed before the noun or pronoun. For example: This cake is for you. I can’t do it without your help. He moves to Germany. You can […]

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Tue, Mar 10th 2015 |
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Plural Feminine Nouns

Plural Feminine Nouns

Plural Nouns Forming the plural of English nouns follows mostly the same pattern. In most cases you have to add -s to the end of the noun. For example: credit card ⇨ credit cards customer ⇨ customers There are some nouns in English that are irregular and do not follow this rule. For example: information […]

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Tue, Feb 24th 2015 |
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German Accusative Prepositions

German Accusative Prepositions

German Prepositions A preposition is a word such as for, without or to. Prepositions show the relationship of a noun or pronoun to some other words and are usually placed before the noun or pronoun. For example: This cake is for you. I can’t do it without your help. He moves to Germany. You can […]

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Tue, Feb 17th 2015 |
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German Question Words - Level B1 and B2

German Question Words – Level B1 and B2

How to ask a question in German A question is a sentence in an interrogative form, addressed to someone in order to get information in reply. In German there are 3 ways of asking a direct question. For more information on how to do that take a look at our How to ask a question […]

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Mon, May 12th 2014 |
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German Adverbs of Time - Level B1 and B2

German Adverbs of Time – Level B1 and B2

German Adverbs of Time German adverbs of time are words like now, today, or soon that all describe time or express when an event or action takes place. We’ve compiled this guide to help you understand and learn the correct way to use the German adverbs of time. You might want to check out our […]

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Mon, Mar 17th 2014 |
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German Adverbs of Time - Level A1 and A2

German Adverbs of Time – Level A1 and A2

German Adverbs of Time German adverbs of time are words like now, today, or soon that all describe time or express when an event or action takes place. We’ve compiled this guide to help you understand and learn the correct way to use the German adverbs of time. Let’s have a closer look below. Learn […]

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Thu, Mar 6th 2014 |
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German Passive Voice

German Passive Voice

German Passive Voice We have put together this quick reference guide to help you understand the German passive voice. In the German and English language there are two voices – the active voice and the passive voice. In a normal, active sentence, the subject is carrying out the action that is described by the verb. […]

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Thu, Aug 15th 2013 |
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How to ask a question in German

How to ask a question in German

How to ask a question in German A question is a sentence in an interrogative form, addressed to someone in order to get information in reply. Quite often questions can be answered with either “yes” or “no”. In German there are 3 ways of asking a direct question: 1. by changing the word order in […]

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Thu, Jun 20th 2013 |
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Mixed German Verbs

Mixed German Verbs

Mixed German Verbs Here is a list of mixed German verbs. They combine elements of Weak Verbs and Strong Verbs. Unlike strong verbs, mixed verbs have no vowel or consonant change in their stem in the present tense. For example: Strong verb: geben ⇨ Er gibt mir einen Kuss. Mixed verb: kennen ⇨ Er kennt […]

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Thu, Jun 6th 2013 |
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German Word order with Adverbs

German Word order with Adverbs

Word order with Adverbs In this post we are looking at the word order of German adverbs. It might also be a good idea to read our blog about German adverbs and German adverbs of place. In English, adverbs can appear in different places within a sentence. That’s the same in German. For example: Tomorrow […]

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Thu, Apr 11th 2013 |
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Solution of the German Verb Test

Solution of the German Verb Test

Here is the solution of our previous blog about the German verbs gehen, nehmen and kommen 1. Wie oft nimmst du diese Tabletten am Tag? (nehmen, present tense) 2. Matthias ging damals in meine Klasse. (gehen, imperfect tense) 3. Giancarlo kommt aus Italien. (kommen, present tense) 4. Wann werden Sie nach Hause gehen? (gehen, future […]

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Mon, Mar 18th 2013 |
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